Monthly Archives: March 2018

Leap-year Observation Spotlight of February 27 and 28

金山巨石群 閏年観測のスポット光

Kanayama Megaliths Leap-year Observation Spotlight of February 27 and 28

The topic of this post at the Kanayama blogsite is the leap-year observation at Stone b  in Iwaya-Iwakage. It takes place on 10/14 and 10/15 and is repeated on 2/27 and 2/28.   The photos for 2/27 and 2/28, when the light returns to the stone, are shown .

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Of further interest is the ongoing study of the 128-year leap-year cycle. The  measurement of 6 cm was recorded. 

52 years have elapsed in the current 128-year cycle of the Kanayama Megaliths calendar. It will next be revised around the year 2094, 76 years from now. We consider the position of the light (in the photo) is as expected. This is in accordance with the theory described in the Guidebook, page 66, as shown at the top of this page.

The post’s concluding remarks were:

Although it is still cold this year, since the sun is steadily heading for spring, there is nothing to worry about. People in the Jomon period must have grasped the changing period of vegetation as well. Nevertheless, their power to build such a calendar building is great ….

 

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February 19, 2018 Winter into Spring

金山巨石群 冬期120日間終了の光

Kanayama Megaliths 120 Days of Winter Ends 2018 21519

This is our excerpt from the blog posted by the Kanayama Megaliths Research Center at  http://blog.livedoor.jp/kanayama_tour-kanayamamegaliths/archives/1070157722.html on 2018.02.22. 

The face of the Sekimen stone in Iwaya-Iwakage is lit by a spotlight for five days from February 15 to 19. February 19 marks the end of the 120-day winter season. (The exact number of days was 119.) The 120 days of winter can be divided into the 60 days of Early Winter ending on the Winter Solstice and the 60 days of Late Winter following the Solstice.

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The Kanayama blogsite has posted two photos taken on 2018.02.19 at 13:23 and 13:33. Note how well the lower edge of the spotlight matches the edge of the Sekimen. Comparison of the two photos shows that the solar altitude has decreased during the ten minutes lapse, causing the spotlight to move higher “up” the stone face. The spotlight of 2/19 matches that of 10/23, because the sun’s altitude is the same on these two days.

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Here is a view of the beam of light entering from the crevice above. Three megaliths form the crevice and shape the sunbeam in exactly the right way.

 

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