Tag Archives: sunrise

Beginning of Winter at Kanayama Megaliths

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There are several new posts at our Japanese counterpart of the the Kanayama Megaliths blog. On 10/23, sixty days before winter solstice, a group trekked up Higashinoyama to see the sunrise. Above is the photo, and this is the 9-meter long stone on which the observer sits.

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The group came down the mountain and went to Iwaya-Iwakage. Here is the sunlight entering the chamber at 12:50pm.

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On 10/24, this striking pattern appeared on the Sekimen-ishi.

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We remind you of the similarity of the Kanayama calendar with the Egyptian calendar. On this date, the rising sun shines into the stone room at the end of the Great Temple of Abu Simbel. Also, the sun rises from the Sphinx on the causeway to the great pyramid of Khafre.

We hope that you have enjoyed these reports of the solar calendar of the Kanayama Megaliths, still operating after 5,000 years!

 

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Higashinoyama: Sixty Days Before Winter Solstice 2018

2018.10.23 Higashinoyama sunrise

This sunrise photo was taken by Chika-san the morning of 2018.10.23 at 09:44:25 on Higashinoyama. On the right of the sun is S Stone, on the left is the 9-m long R stone which points in the sunrise direction.

This observation heralds the approach of the winter solstice sixty days hence. The sun will occupy the same position on February 20 as it heads north for the summer. These two dates, 10/23 and 2/20 which bound winter, together with the two summer dates of 4/22 and 8/20, divide the sun’s zone in the sky into four equal parts.

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Furthermore, when the winter and summer solstice dates are included, we obtain the six-season Kanayama Solar Calendar.

Six-season chart

 

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60 Days Before the Summer Solstice

From Friday, April 20th to Sunday 22nd, 2018
The above photo of the whole area, showing the Iwaya-Iwakage cluster on the left and the simulator building and the Senkoku-ishi grouping on the right, was taken from Highway 86 early in the morning of April 20.  Kanayama Megaliths blog has posted a new report dated April 26, 2018.   It is about the observation of 60 days before the summer solstice in the solar calendar of the Kanayama megaliths. It is the sunlight observation that tells the beginning of summer at the April 22 milestone date of the Kanayama Six-Season calendar.
At 6: 54 in the morning, light begins to stream from the top mountain. Summer observation is mainly at Senkoku-ishi. Looking at the position where the sun rises from the megalith, we see the sun just ascending from the mountain in the east at the Higashinoyama group. Now it’s past seven, and the light begins to reach Iwaya-Iwakage which is located somewhat higher than the Senkoku-ishi.
Then light begins to penetrate into the grotto of Senkoku-ishi. Around 7 a.m., sunight starts to shine on every single megalith. Although it starts out rather chilly, when the sun comes out, we feel the air of summer already.
Today Kobayashi-san is here, and there is a television interview going on. Kobayashi-san is standing in front of the shadow on Senkoku-ishi. this shadow is cast by the megalith in the lower right photo, below, on the morning of April 22.
As the sun rises higher, the grotto is illuminated, and the triangular face is very bright. On May 21, this face will be adorned with dashes of sunlight.
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Himukae Ceremony on Winter Solstice 2017 – Part 2

IMGP0691Winter solstice sunrise at Asadori Myoujin by Chika

Chika-san has provided additional photos from the Himukae ceremony on the morning of winter solstice. Above is the splendid view of the sunrise, looking from Asadori’s torii.

The head priest who conducted the ritual had a very old scroll in his hands, so old that it was quite in tatters. And yet, this ceremony to greet the sun has come down through the ages from prehistoric times. We are fortunate to be able to participate even today with a precious activity of the Jomon people of Hinomoto.

 

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Higashinoyama Megaliths

S stone & Sun

Rising sun is barely visible in front of the R-stone (left) and S-stone (right foreground)

Sugisaka-san was on the hike up Higashinoyama on Winter Solstice day. He has kindly shared his photos taken of the R and S megaliths that face the rising sun on that day. He mounted his camera on a tall pole so we have some striking overhead views of the two megaliths.

 

Here we see a red-jacketed woman climbing up to the observation seat on R-stone. On the left, she assists another person.

S stone & R stone

This is a side view of S-stone which is to the right of R-stone as we face east. Both stones play their roles at other winter observation times.

 

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Himukae Ceremony on Winter Solstice 2017

Asadori ritual

Chika-san attended the Asadori Myoujin Himukae ceremony for the revival of the sun’s power. It took place as the sun rose in the south-east on the morning of winter solstice, shining directly into the center of the altar. Below is the altar before the sunrise, and then immediately as the sunlight illuminated the sacred object within.

Above is a photo of the priest explaining the ritual. He shouted the cock-crowing “Ko-ki-ko!” three times as a greeting to the sun. The group recited “Oh!”. This is a cry of joy that the sun is returning. Chika-san said that this ritual that musters life-force is very moving. The bright lights are the flashlights people are holding while it is still dark before sunrise.

Sun stones.  Once, there were behind the hokora, a Sun Stone and five stones behind it. Now there are only three, because two of them were moved. The two men who touched the stones were subsequently afflicted with illness. That is why there are only three stones behind the Sun Stone, and no one is permitted to move the other two back. Lining up each of the three stones with the Sun Stone is the way to view sunrise at three distinct times of the year. In the photo below, the Sun Stone is indicated by a red dot, and the three alignment stones are marked with blue dots.

太陽石と3つの石

 

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Winter Solstice Sunrise at Higashinoyama

 

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This is part one of the winter solstice report from Shiho Tokuda, describing the hike up Higashinoyama. The original is posted on the Kanayama Megaliths blog. Early in the morning of December 22, 2017, the observation group met at the lower megaliths site. Although astronomical sunrise is at 7 a.m., due to the mountainous terrain, the sun would appear later on the mountain.

There is no trail up to the megaliths, so it is rough going. At 8:40, after a difficult hike, the long megalith is seen through the trees. The members took turns at the snow-covered observation post. They were rewarded with a view of the winter sun peeking bravely through the trees of the forest.

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Please go on to part two.

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